The happiest 5k in the world

That’s right. This unfit bunny is going to be walking her way through the colour run this November! Given this challenge is only 6 weeks away I’m kinda nervous…

I know I can do it, it’s really not all that far. The part that is worrying me is that I’ll need to still go to work the next day! I want to make sure I train enough that I’m not going to want to pass out the next day.

So here are some things I have found out about doing my first 5k thanks to http://running.about.com/od/5kracetrainingschedules/tp/5-Things-To-Know-Before-Running-Your-First-5k.htm.

1) You should practice running outside. It’s fine to do some of your training on the treadmill, but make sure that you also do some runs outside. You use different muscles when you run outdoors so, if you run exclusively on a treadmill running, you may have a hard time adjusting to a different surface during the race. While there are some benefits of treadmill running, doing some of your miles outside will help get you more physically and mentally prepared for the race.

2) You don’t need to carbo-load for a 5K. Some people hear about runners eating lots of carbs before a big race and they think it applies before running any race. You really only need extra carbs if you’re running a longer distance race such as a half or full marathon. If you’re running a 5K, you don’t need to load up on carbs the day before the race. Just eat what you would normally eat the day before the race, but try to avoid foods fatty or greasy foods that might lead to gastrointestinal issues.

3) You won’t get disqualified for walking. Some beginners worry about having to take a walk break during a race because they think they’ll look or feel like a failure. They equate waking with throwing in the towel. There’s no shame in taking a walking break! In fact, using a run/walk approach can be a very smart race strategy because it may help you avoid the muscle fatigue that often happens towards the end of races. Some race participants find that taking short walk breaks actually helps them achieve an overall faster race pace than if they tried to run the entire distance.

Reassuring!

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